Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Every Amazon Books Location, Mapped - Publishers' Weekly

Panzer was tootling around in the Catosphere when he heard ohing and ahing coming from outside. Following all the noise, took our kitty boy to the Publishers' Weekly (PW) site. With no digging at all he found a post about Amazon's bricks and mortar stores.

Is this a building frenzy?
According to the post by Jim Milliot, Amazon has announced the projected opening of five more bricks and mortar stores in 2017. These five new stores will join the five already opened for a total of ten. Two of the already opened stores have cafes, but it's unknown if any of the upcoming five stores will include this feature. There's a map included in the post that shows the locations of the current bricks and mortar stores and the proposed locations for the new ones.

Panzer says, "Hmm ... Is there going to be one near you?"

Note: This is a medium length post. Bring a cup of tea and a muffin for today's reading selection.

To read the post, tootle over to Amazon bricks and mortar stores

Monday, March 27, 2017

A New Panzerism

Panzer on technology:

Today, Mom and What's His Name were talking about that World Wide Spider Web.
What's His Name got lost in it and Mom was trying to help him find his way out.

Well, I can help them because I have that thing all figured out.

It's like those dark and gloomy spaces under Mom's furniture.

If you keep digging around ...

Eventually ...
Oh look, What's His Name's wallet.*

After you get all the dust bunnies out of the cobwebs ...

You find the good stuff ...

like my feather, my string, my catnip-filled mouse.



* From Cat Wisdom for Humans

Friday, March 24, 2017

Fact Check: Amazon to "Collect" Sales Tax in All US States - The Digital Reader

Panzer's trip into the Catosphere today took him to The Digital Reader site. There our adventuresome kitty boy found a post about Amazon's sales tax collections.

According to the post by site owner Nate Hoffelder, Amazon's newest announcement about the states' sales tax collections the company is doing appears to be causing some confusion. Apparently, the sales tax collections aren't what they're being professed by some to be. Yesterday, Panzer told you about Amazon's agreement with Maine to begin collecting sales tax on the company's sales to Maine residents. Mr. Hoffelder points out in his post that Amazon will only be collecting sales tax on their own sales to Maine residents not the sales made by merchants who use Amazon's platform for their sales to Maine residents.
It's not a secret how it works.

This same procedure of merchants collecting and paying their own taxes applies to all the states Amazon collects sales taxes in for the company's sales.

Panzer says, "Umm ... Mom and my books (paperbacks) and other stuff are sold on the Amazon platform. Amazon doesn't collect sales tax for our sales. We pay the sales tax (use tax) to our state for the sales."

Note: This is a medium length post. Bring a cup of cocoa and muffin for today's reading selection.

To read the post, tootle over to Amazon sales tax

To read yesterday's post about Amazon collecting sales tax for Maine (and other states), tootle over to Maine sales taxes

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Amazon to begin collecting sales taxes in Maine next month - Yahoo! Finance

Today's trip into the Catosphere took Panzer to the Yahoo! Finance site. There our kitty investigator found a post about Amazon.

It's not going to happen..
According to the Associated Press post, Amazon plans to begin collecting a 5.5 percent sales tax on all products sold to Maine residents. Businesses located in Maine and selling products there are required to collect the sales tax. The state wants businesses located outside the state boundaries to collect the same sales tax and Amazon has now agreed to do this.  Amazon also plans to begin collecting sales taxes in Hawaii, Idaho and New Mexico.

Panzer says, "Don't even start thinking about sales taxing my catnip ... or ... you'll be sorry."

Note: This is a short post. Bring a cup of tea for today's reading selection.

To read the post, tootle over to Amazon collecting Maine sales tax

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Hachette Partners with Wattpad to Produce Audiobooks - Publishers' Weekly

When Panzer was cleaning out the Panzermobile today, he found a post scrunched under the passenger seat. Spreading out the post, our fastidious kitty discovered it was from a trip he made to the Publishers' Weekly site. The post was about Hachette and Wattpad's new partnership.

Mom's feeling better.
According to the post by Calvin Reid, Hachette and Wattpad are partnering to produce audiobooks. The audiobooks will use popular Wattpad author's stories. Plans are to have 50 audiobooks available in the summer of this year. They will be available at iTunes and other sellers. No titles or authors have been announced yet.

Panzer says, "It makes this little kitty want to post some of his work at Wattpad. Maybe it will become popular with the readers there."

Note: This is a medium length post. Bring a cup of tea and one and a half muffins for today's reading selection.

To read the post, tootle over to Hachette and Wattpad

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Sick Days

Mom's been sick for the last three days. She's feeling better and plans to post tomorrow.

Friday, March 17, 2017

St. Patrick's Day












In Face of NEA Cuts, Small Presses Worry About Their Futures - Publishers' Weekly

Today Panzer was taking his afternoon nap when his cat bed was shaken by screaming and crying coming from the Catosphere. Our sleepy kitty jumped in Panzermobile and headed out. Following all the noise took him to the Publishers' Weekly (PW) site. There he found a post about the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).

Cats had nothing to do with him. You did it.
According to the post by Jason Boog, President Donald Trump's budget for the U.S. government has been given to Congress. As rumored earlier, the President's budget cuts all funding for the National Endowment for the Arts and, therefore, effectively closing the agency. This proposed budget will certainly have a negative impact on small presses. Small presses receive money through sources who themselves receive NEA money. Some presses will be forced to close and others will be tightening their own budgets.

Panzer says, "Umm ... I wonder if there's even more bad news for writers and publishers in this budget."

Note: This is a long post. Bring a cup of tea and two muffins for today's reading selection.

To read the post, tootle over to NEA cuts

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Ebook sales continue to fall as younger generations drive appetite for print - The Guardian

Panzer's trip into the Catosphere today took our adventuresome kitty to The Guardian site. With just a little digging he found a post about UK ebook sales.

According to the post by Sian Cain, quoting from the Nielsen Book Research UK, ebook sales were down in the U.K. in 2016. Ebook sales fell 4 perceent for the year while physical book sales were up by 2 percent. The increase in print sales in 2016 was due to children's physical book sales. This is the second year of physical book sales increase. The increase in 2015 was due to adult coloring book sales.

Hmm ... Are print books coming back?
Panzer says, "Maybe ebook authors should pay attention to what's happening in the U.K. It just might be spreading."

Note: This is a long post. Bring a cup of tea and one and a half muffins for today's reading selection.

To read the post, tootle over to Ebook sales

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

London Book Fair 2017: For Publishers, Business Is Booming, But Brexit Means Uncertainty - Publishers' Weekly

Today Panzer was tootling around in the Panzermobile when he heard grumbling and questioning noises coming from the Catosphere ahead of him. It only took our traveling kitty a short time to find the hubbub was coming from the Publishers' Weekly (PW) site. With a little digging he found a post about the London Book Fair (LBF) that was raising all the questions.

According to the post at the Publishers' Weekly site, the London Book Fair opened with discussions about the questions of how Brexit will effect publishing in the UK. UK Publishers Association chief executive Stephen Lotinga, DK Publishing CEO Ian Hudson, and HarperCollins CEO Charlie Redmayne discussed the uncertainties of issues of free trade, currency, and copyright among others.

Panzer says, "Brexit is turning out not to be simple for the publishing industry."

Note: This is a long post. Bring a cup of cocoa and two chocolate cookies (biscuits) for today's reading selection.

To read the post, tootle over to London Book Fair 2017

ShareThis